Climate Change

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USET Awarded Outstanding Leadership in Climate Adaptation

The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies celebrated the six winners of the 2020 Climate Adaptation Leadership Awards for Natural Resources during the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Virtual Annual Meeting. Among the awardees was the United South and Eastern Tribes – Office of Environmental Resource Management (USET-OERM) for their work in connecting Tribal natural-cultural resource departments, environmental  departments, and other Tribal programmatic staff with resources at the Northeast and Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Centers (NE/SE CASCs) and for hosting key networking and programmatic support events for Tribal Nations such as the Tribal Climate Resilience Summit, Climate Adaptation Plan Writing Retreats, USET Climate Change Adaptation Stories and Resources Web Page and the planned Tribal Climate Resilience Camp.  The Leadership in Climate Awards were established in 2016 to recognize outstanding leadership by individuals, organizations, businesses, and agencies to support the resilience of America’s vital natural resources and the many people, businesses, and communities that depend on them in the face of a changing climate. We are proud to recognize these leaders who are on the ground implementing adaptation strategies to safeguard our fish, wildlife, and plants now and for future generations. Please help us in congratulating these #AdaptationLeaders!

The award reception can be viewed here (at minute 18:25). Accepting the award on behalf of USET are Aranzazu Lascurain, Assistant University Director for the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) and Casey Thornbrugh, Tribal Climate Science Liaison with the United South and Eastern Tribes.

ATNI and Partners to host a Virtual National Tribal Leadership Climate Change Summit

The Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians (ATNI) and partners: the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), United South and Eastern Tribes (USET), and Pacific Northwest Tribes will host the National Tribal Leadership Climate Change Summit from October 2020 to May 2021. The First Session will take place Tuesday, October 13, 2020 from 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM Pacific (1 PM-4 PM Eastern and 12 PM-3 PM Central).  The Summit will convene Tribal leaders, youth, and staff from Tribal Nations, First Nations, and Indigenous communities worldwide and will begin with a series of virtual sessions focused on critical climate change topics. Collectively, participants will have an opportunity to engage in presentations and discussions around three goals:

  1. Build on the knowledge and shared experiences of climate change impacts.
  2. Learn how to use our traditional knowledge to develop approaches that assert Tribal leadership and perspectives in climate change adaptation, mitigation, and resiliency.
  3. Foster pathways to influence climate policy regionally, nationally, and internationally. 

The Summit will include internationally renowned plenary speakers, participatory breakout sessions, youth sessions, climate solution exhibition, and more. The Summit will culminate in developing a policy platform to ensure that Tribal Nations, First Nations, and Indigenous communities are leading in moving climate policy forward in the United States and worldwide.  For more information SEE HERE. Registration Deadline is October 10th.  The direct link to registration is here.

ATNI and Partners to host a Virtual National Tribal YOUTH Leadership Climate Change Summit

The Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians (ATNI) would hold a Youth Advocacy Session on Friday, October 9th from 2-5 PM Eastern (1-4 PM Central) as a precursor to the 2020 National Tribal Leadership Climate Change Summit.  The purpose of the Youth Advocacy Session is to learn about the international climate policy considerations and ways Indigenous youth can become leaders for climate action.  Honored guests for this session will include Dr. Kyle Whyte (University of Michigan George Willis Pack Professor) and a former US House Representative. See here to register.
Be sure to indicate “interest in youth session” at the bottom of the registration form.

This will also be a Youth Video Contest.  To participate in the video contest, submit a video to the Indigenous Youth Video Contest for a change to win a trip to the in-person 2021 Youth Climate Summit in Seattle, WA. Try to submit by October 7, 2020. See more information here or email your questions or reach out for feedback while creating your video at Submissions.Natl.Tribal.Summit@gmail.com.

Solving the Climate Crisis: The Congressional Action Plan for a Clean Energy Economy and a Healthy America

The U.S. House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis recently released their Climate Crisis Action plan, which lays out plans to work towards ambitious and actionable climate solutions that Congress should enact to benefit American communities in addressing climate change. This 547-page report includes a section on Partnering with Tribal Nations and Indigenous Communities for Climate Adaptation and Resilience. For more information or to access the full report, click here.

Institute for Environmental Professionals (ITEP): Narrative Submissions for the Status of Tribes and Climate Change Report

The Institute of Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) Tribes and Climate Change Program is publishing a report called the “Status of Tribes and Climate Change” (STACC). This report strives to broaden the reach and understanding from a Tribal perspective of the impacts and responses to climate change. ITEP is seeking contributors for an important feature of this report, which will be the inclusion of narratives and testimonials directly from Tribal Nations, illustrating the lived experiences of Tribal peoples as they relate to climate change. The testimonials may come from Tribal citizens, Tribal leaders, or Tribal environmental departments, and can address impacts and/or solutions. These testimonials may take the format of either written pieces, audio recordings, or video recordings. Deadline for submissions is October 25, 2020. If you have any questions, please contact Dara Marks Marino, at dara.marks-marino@nau.edu.

North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center Launches the Tribal Climate Leaders Program (TCLP).

The Tribal Climate Leaders Program (TCLP) supports Native American graduate students to become the next generation of Tribal environmental leaders. The TCLP was launch this fall 2020 and will be providing 5 fully-funded, 2-year fellowships to Native American students pursuing a graduate degree at the University of Colorado Boulder in fields related to climate adaptation science. This is a new pilot program open to Native American students affiliated with the 32 federally-recognized Tribes in the 7-state North Central region.
To read more about current fellows see here.

GRID Alternatives: Tribal Solar Energy Training for Tribal Practitioners

The Grid Alternatives’ Tribal Program Office is offering a paid, two-week solar energy training for Tribal energy practitioners and individual Tribal citizens. This opportunity will provide travel and lodging stipends for interested parties. Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, training dates have not been identified yet, however, the Program will provide virtual training later this year if necessary.

If you would like to be considered for this training event, please respond to this questionnaire.

The Indigenous Environmental Network: Offering Free, Virtual Carbon Pricing Training Workshops

The Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) is providing free virtual educational trainings on carbon pricing in Indian Country. These virtual workshops aim to create collaborative spaces to discuss and learn about carbon pricing mechanisms and are tailored to fit each interested individuals or organization. IEN will be offering these virtual workshops from September to December 2020.

For more information or to sign up for a workshop, please click here.

New Study Finds That Focal Species in Similar Habitats will Respond Differently to Climate Change

Scientists currently have little understanding about the degree to which species that use similar habitats will experience and respond to climate and land-use change. Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) supported researchers assessed suitable connected habitat for focal species in the southeastern U.S. under a changing climate and found that each species faces different levels of climate and land-use threat and though these focal species inhabit similar spaces, their ability to adapt to future changes differs. Full story here.

Internship and Engagement Program for Native College Students at the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center

April Taylor is a Tribal Liaison at the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) and is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. She received her B.S. from Texas A&M University in Marine Science and a M.E.E.R.M from the University of South Carolina in Earth and Environmental Resource Management. One aspect of the SC CASC’s Tribal engagement program is their workforce development. Workforce development is a priority due to building relationships with Tribal Nations and communities and developing the next generation of Tribal climate staff. It includes doing outreach to Native youth at Tribal camps, festivals, and after school programs. The second aspect includes mentoring Native college students. The third aspect is working with American Indian educators including hosting workshops. We are currently planning a NASA Earth to Sky workshop for native educators and we hope to reschedule next year in 2021. The SC CASC has hosted 37 students that have worked on a Tribal projects.  Here is a summary of the SC CASC’s current four Native student employees and their respective research topics this summer:

Hello! My name is Jacob Nichols, I am studying Biomedical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma and I am a Chickasaw Nation School-To-Work Student at the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. I am currently developing a presentation and flyer on fire adaptation, which includes a history of fire, applications of prescribed burning for the purpose of climate adaptation, and Tribal programs and practices as they relate to those topics.

SC CASC student interns pose for a photo with April Taylor, right, at the University of Oklahoma.  Jacob Nichols, left, and Matthew Armor center.

 “Hello! I am Matthew Armor. I am an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation and pursuing a geography degree at the University of Oklahoma. I am able to work and go to school through the unique opportunity of the Chickasaw School to Work Program working at the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. The project I am working on involves the mapping and analysis of oil and gas production in the Chickasaw and Choctaw nations. Another related project, is the research of early oil and gas history within the two nations to see the impact of the industry on both Tribal Nations and Tribal activity within the industry.

Hello! I’m Peyton Cavnar. I’m an undergraduate at the University of Oklahoma and a student employee at the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center! I’m majoring in environmental sustainability. Because of my Apache and Comanche heritage, I hold an interest in the relationship between our changing climate and indigenous cultures and communities. My current project revolves around this relationship. I am researching both historical and contemporary Native American seed banking and analyzing how they not only keep cultural traditions alive, but also help communities prepare for a changing climate. Climate adaptation is not a word commonly associated with Indigenous land management practices. However, as my project evolves, Native American seed banking and other environmental management traditions are shown to be a relevant resource for adapting to climate change.

 “Hello! I am Heath Steward, a senior at Oklahoma State University where I am working on a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. I am Bureau of Indian Affairs Pathways Program Intern of three years. This summer I am working with April Taylor of the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center on a project which seeks to assess how National Wildlife Refuge managers in Oklahoma manage for culturally significant plant species and for the effects of climate change.

Hello! My name is Jovon Jojola, I am an enrolled member of the Pueblo of Isleta, located in the State of New Mexico. I am also a Bureau of Indian Affairs Pathways intern located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This summer I worked on downloading precipitation data from USGS, and a few other sites. The data that was downloaded with some help from New Mexico State University, and my boss Maurice Cruz at the SC CASC. We were able to compile the data to a GIS map that shows the snow pack and precipitation data for tribal lands within the state. This map is currently being worked on.

SC CASC’s Native Youth resources web page: https://southcentralclimate.org/native-nations/youth-resources/


Traditional Cherokee Lands Placed in Conservation Easement

A brief intro to a story posted on the USFS Tribal Relations blog on July 28th, 2020: “The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) has successfully competed for a second Forest Service Community Forest Program grant to continue enhancing the Hall Mountain Community Forest in Macon County, North Carolina. Hall Mountain is a culturally and historically significant EBCI landscape that was once threatened by developers. In 2012, EBCI, in collaboration with the Little Tennessee Land Trust, earned their first Community Forest Program grant to incorporate a public hiking trail highlighting the natural resources used and managed by the Tribal Nation. Now, the Tribal Nation is ready to enter phase 2 of enhancing the forest by expanding the acreage and building an eagle aviary on the property.” Read more about this project by Clicking Here.

Cherokee Elk Study shows importance to Appalachian community and economy

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and survey research firm Responsive Management recently released the results of an economic analysis showing that the presence of elk is important to the southern Appalachian community and its economy. The scientific study assessed economic impacts and measured public opinion toward elk among Tribal citizens and visitors to the Cherokee area.  To better manage elk as a resource, the Tribal Nation is investing in elk restoration and protection, but a better understanding of the community’s perspective and the value of elk to the community is necessary for determining the scope and limits of this investment. For the full story in the Cherokee One Feather Click Here.

Climate Change Will Decrease Prescribed Fire Opportunities in the Southeastern U.S.

Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) researchers found that many ecosystems in the southeastern United States that are home to the region’s most iconic species–like longleaf pine, gopher tortoises, and red-cockaded woodpeckers– may have fewer opportunities for prescribed fires in the future due to elevated temperatures. Furthermore, managers may not be able to rely on consistently good burning conditions (i.e. the “prescribed burn window”) in the spring as hot weather arrives earlier and earlier in the year. The full story can be found HERE.

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Workshop: Biological Thresholds in the Context of Climate Adaptation

The Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) will host the workshop, “Biological Thresholds in the Context of Climate Adaptation”, via Zoom on October 7-8. Through this workshop, participants will identify climate-driven or management thresholds for populations, ecosystems, and landscapes to inform climate change adaptation and cultural/natural management plans as well as explore research opportunities for future work. Learn more HERE.

Funding Opportunities
and Resources

NOAA RESTORE Science Program Funding Opportunity: Planning for Actionable Science
full proposals are due December 15th, 2020.  The NOAA RESTORE Science Program invites you to apply to our new funding competition, Planning for Actionable Science. This competition will provide natural resource managers, researchers, and other stakeholders with funding to plan a research project that informs a specific management decision impacting natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. The Science Program is making approximately $2.5 million available for this competition to fund approximately 20 planning projects that will run for one year each. Please see the full announcement here complete instructions.

NOAA Effects of Sea Level Rise Program (ESLR)   
Letters of intent are due October 16, 2020; full proposals are due January 7th, 2021.  NOAA is soliciting proposals for the Effects of Sea Level Rise Program (ESLR). The program name was shortened in 2020, and was formerly known as the Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise Program (EESLR). This solicitation is to improve adaptation and planning in response to regional and local effects of sea level rise and coastal inundation through targeted research on key technologies, natural and nature-based infrastructure, physical and biological processes, and model evaluation. The overall goal of the ESLR Program is to facilitate informed adaptation planning and coastal management decisions through a multidisciplinary research program that results in integrated models of dynamic physical and biological processes capable of evaluating vulnerability and resilience under multiple SLR, inundation, and management scenarios. Funding is contingent upon the availability of Fiscal Year 2021 Federal appropriations. It is anticipated that projects funded under this announcement will have a September 1, 2021 or September 1, 2022 start date. Please see the full announcement here complete instructions.

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) – Request for Applications Demonstration Sites in Climate and Health Supplemental funds for climate and health activities in local health departments. Deadline: October 16, 2020. The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) supports local efforts to track, prevent, and mitigate the health effects of climate change. According to the NACCHO Climate Change Policy Statement, these efforts include (1) the incorporation of adaptation planning into land use, housing, and transportation design; (2) preparing communities for extreme and unusual environmental events; and (3) coordinating with local governments on allhazards disaster planning. NACCHO supports implementing existing policies and procedures (e.g., CDC BRACE framework) and integrating climate change into ongoing performance improvement measures (e.g., Public Health Accreditation). For more information, visit: https://www.naccho.org/uploads/full-width-images/RFA_Climate-Change-Demo_Final_9.8.2020.pdf.

2020 Fish Passage Program
Applications deadline extended to October 28, 2020.  The National Fish Passage Program (NFPP) is a voluntary program that provides direct technical and financial assistance to partners. The program works in partnership to provide fish (and other aquatic organisms) passage and restore aquatic connectivity for the benefit of federal trust resources. In doing so, the program aims to maintain or increase fish populations to improve ecosystem resiliency and to provide quality fishing experiences for the American people. To view the funding opportunity click here.

NOAA Species Recovery Grants for Tribal Nations 
Applications are due October 29th, 2020.  The NOAA Fisheries’ RFP for Species Recovery Grants for Tribal Nations is now open. These grants support Tribally-led management, research, monitoring, and outreach activities that have direct conservation benefits for ESA-listed species. Recently delisted species, proposed, and candidate species are also eligible. A list of the species can be found at https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species-directory/threatened-endangered. For links to lists of proposed, candidate, and recently delisted species, please see the links in the announcement posted HERE.

USDA Rural Development: Rural Energy for America Program
Applications are due November 2, 2020 and March 31, 2021.  The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) provides guaranteed loan financing and grant funding to agricultural producers and rural small businesses for renewable energy systems or to make energy efficiency improvements. Agricultural producers with at least 50 percent of their gross income coming from agricultural operations or small businesses in eligible rural areas are encouraged to apply. Applications are open and are accepted year-round at your state USDA-Rural Development Energy office. For more information about the REAP application, please click here.

 

NOAA Adaptation Science Program                                                Applications are due November 30, 2020.  For Fiscal Year 2021, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Adaptation Science Program is soliciting proposals focused on U.S. coastal communities planning for the future impacts of flooding in the context of climate change and other stressors. The program seeks to advance the science of adaptation by soliciting proposals for interdisciplinary and social science research projects that accelerate, expand and enhance the effectiveness and scale of adaptation and resilience planning and implementation in the face of complex challenges in coastal settings.  For more information see here.

FEMA Fiscal Year 2020 Notice of Funding Opportunity for Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants
Applications are due January 29, 2021.  FEMA has posted the Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) Notification of Funding Opportunities (NOFOs) for the Flood Mitigation Assistance (FMA) grant program and the new Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) pre-disaster mitigation grant programs. FEMA’s two competitive mitigation grant programs provide states, local communities, Tribal Nations and territories (SLTTs) funding for eligible mitigation activities to strengthen our nation’s ability to build a culture of preparedness by reducing disaster losses and protecting life and property from future disaster damages. The application opens on September 30, 2020 and will remain open through January 2021. The grants link contains information about the program, application details, and links to sign up for FEMA webinars. The overview link has a cleaner description of the program and its goals. More information can be found HERE.

Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI)   
Fact Sheet:
Federal Resources for Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change has provided this fact sheet as a survey of federal funding and technical assistance available to help state and local governments and agencies, Tribal Nations, non-governmental organizations, universities, and individuals implement nature-based solutions for climate resilience. Many of these sources of federal support allow communities to develop projects which draw on the multiple, interrelated benefits of nature-based solutions.  To access the fact sheet, click here.

DOC EDA FY2019 EDA Disaster Supplementals
Applications are accepted on a continuing basis and processed as received. This investment assistance will help communities and regions devise and implement long-term economic recovery strategies through a variety of non-construction and construction projects, as appropriate, to address economic challenges in areas where a Presidential declaration of a major disaster was issued under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. For more information and to apply, click here.

Student Opportunities

First Nations: Native Agriculture and Food Systems College Scholarship
Applications due October 15th, 2020 (7 PM Eastern, 6 PM Central, 5 PM Mountain). The Native Agriculture and Food Systems Scholarship Program that aims to encourage more Native American college students to enter these fields so that they can better assist their communities in advancing Native food sovereignty and improving overall health.  First Nations will award 20 to 25 scholarships of $1,000 to $1,500 each for the 2020-2021 academic school year to Native college students majoring in agriculture and agriculture-related fields, including agribusiness management, agri-science technologies, agronomy, animal husbandry, aquaponics, environmental studies, fisheries and wildlife, food production and safety, food-related policy and legislation, food science and technology, horticulture, irrigation science, and sustainable agriculture or food systems.  Complete information and a link to the online application can be found HERE.

                         

2020 NAFWS Southeast Region Scholarship 
An academic scholarship opportunity for Tribal natural resource students in the southeast.  The scholarship is for $1000, to assist college students (undergraduate & graduate) that are enrolled with any of the Tribes of the NAFWS Southeast Region and who are within the fields of natural resources and/or environmental sciences. The due date is October 16, 2020 at 6 PM EDT. For additional information and how to apply click here.

 

First Nations Development Institute: 2021 Luce Indigenous Knowledge Fellowship
Applications due October 22nd, 2020, 5 PM Mountain Time, 6 PM Central, 7 PM Eastern. The First Nations Development Institute and The Henry Luce Foundation announce the opening of the grant application process for the 2021 Luce Indigenous Knowledge Fellowship. The fellowship is a 12-month, self-directed enrichment program designed to support the growth, development, knowledge and networks of Indigenous knowledge holders and knowledge makers. In this second year of the program, First Nations will again award 10 fellowships of $50,000 each to outstanding Native knowledge holders and knowledge makers engaged in meaningful work that benefits Indigenous people and communities in either reservation and/or urban settings.  This fellowship supports Native knowledge holders and knowledge makers as they advance their work and significantly move forward their field in ways that will ultimately lead to broad, transformative impacts for Indigenous peoples.  For more information see here.

 

NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
Applications due January 8th, 2021. NOAA is pleased to announce the 2021 call for applications for NOAA’s Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowship (C&GC) program. The fellowship program has an outstanding reputation for attracting the best and the brightest PhDs in the sciences relevant to climate change. Each appointed fellow is hosted by a mentoring scientist at a U.S. university or research institution to work in an area of mutual interest.  Fellows  focus  on  observing, understanding, modeling, and predicting climate variability and change on seasonal and longer time scales. This includes the documentation and analysis of past, current, or possible future climate variability and change as well as the study of the underlying physical, chemical, and biological processes.  Fellows  are  UCAR employees and receive a fixed annual salary, plus UCAR’s benefits and allowances  for  relocation,  travel and publications. Appointments will be announced by April 1, 2021.  For more information go here .

 

Graduate Student Scholarship Opportunity: Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY)
Applications accepted on a rolling basis (but note SUNY fall/spring application deadlines). Graduate Study Opportunity Integrating Indigenous and Scientific Knowledges for Environmental Sustainability. The Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at the State University of New York (SUNY) College of Environmental Science & Forestry is recruiting students for graduate study in diverse environmental sciences from ecology, sustainability, conservation biology to restoration and environmental engineering. As a member of the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership, the program provides funding for full tuition and stipends for Native American students pursuing MS and PhD degrees. Applications are open so please join us in this exciting initiative. Additional information can be found online at https://www.esf.edu/nativepeoples or contact Dr. Robin Wall Kimmerer at rkimmer@esf.edu.

Additional Resources

Forest Adaptation Webinar Series – Climate Change Response Framework  

The Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science (NIACS) and the Forest Stewards Guild worked together to offer a webinar series focused on forests and climate change adaptation.  The series brought together scientists and managers to learn about and discuss emerging topics related to the effects of climate change on forest management, with a focus in New England and New York.  These webinars have been archived and can be viewed here.

 

Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network


The Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN) seeks to convene Indigenous peoples to identify threats to Indigenous self-determination and ways of life and to formulate adaptation and mitigation strategies, dialogues, and educational programs that build Indigenous capacities to address climate-related issues. This website provides the latest tools and resources for Indigenous peoples and scientists to work together towards meeting the current challenges of climate change.  To go to the NICRN website, click here.

The Tribal Adaptation Menu (TAM)

The Tribal Adaptation Menu (TAM) is an extensive collection of climate change adaptation actions for natural resource management, organized into tiers of general and more specific ideas. While this first version of the Menu was created based on Ojibwe and Menominee perspectives, languages, concepts and values (hence its name in language–Dibaginjigaadeg Anishinaabe Ezhitwaad), it was intentionally designed to be adaptable to other Indigenous communities, allowing for the incorporation of their language, knowledge and culture.  The TAM authors and team provide culturally-supportive climate change adaptation planning workshops.  For more information see here.  

Bureau of Indian Affairs: Tribal Resilience Program        

The BIA Tribal Resilience Program (TRP) provides federal-wide resources to Tribal Nations to build capacity and resilience through leadership engagement, delivery of data and tools, training and Tribal capacity building. Direct funding supports Tribal Nations, Tribal consortia, and authorized Tribal organizations to build resilience through competitive awards for Tribally designed resilience training, adaptation planning, vulnerability assessments, supplemental monitoring, capacity building, and youth engagement. The resilient ocean and coastal management effort supports planning, science and tools, and capacity for coastal Tribal Nation’s ocean management, including the Great Lakes.  For more information, see here.

Tribal Climate Change Guide

Tribal Climate Change Funding Guide is intended to provide up-to-date information on grants, programs and plans that may assist Tribal Nations in addressing climate change through a broad range of sectors. We will update this guide regularly, so please check back often. If you have questions or updates for this guide, email: kathy@uoregon.edu. Please note that for entries that are accepting applications continuously, the grant deadline column will list “12/31/2017” as the grant deadline. This ensures that those grants will appear immediately after those grants with a set deadline.  To go to the Tribal Climate Change Guide, click here.

Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP): Tribal Climate Change Program    

ITEP’s Climate Change Program is a resource for Tribal Nations and Tribal environmental and other program staff for climate change adaptation support.  The ITEP Climate Change Program provides climate change adaptation planning workshops and trainings via webinar and in-person.  For more information see ITEP’s Climate Change Program webpage here

 Free Course: Climate Models, Downscaling & Assessments

October 5th – October 30th. In Fall 2020, the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) at the University of Oklahoma will will offer two short online courses that will provide an integrative understanding of the components of the climate system. Registration is free but required. The deadline to register is October 5th. This course will be live from October 5 – October 30, 2020.  For more information see here.

VIRTUAL Meeting: NE CASC Biological Thresholds Workshop

October 27th, 2020; Please RSVP by August 8thThe Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) is pleased to announce the Biological Thresholds Workshop, which will take place in October 2020. Environmental and natural resources managers are invited to join NE CASC staff and principle investigators in the fall for what promises to be an exciting and informative experience.  To better predict the response of plants and wildlife to climate change, we seek to understand the mechanisms that drive changes in the distribution and abundance of plant and animal species, including any thresholds (non-linear responses) that might soon be crossed. Through this workshop, we will identify climate-driven or management thresholds for populations, ecosystems, and landscapes to inform climate change adaptation and cultural/natural management plans as well as prioritizing research opportunities.
The workshop will be spread over three days. The first two days (Oct 7th & 8th) will be promoted widely and are open to a general audience. The final day (Oct 27th) will provide an opportunity for smaller, more focused discussions to inform future NE CASC work and will be open exclusively to invited NE CASC partners and collaborators like you. With this email, we enthusiastically invite you to participate in the full workshop program, particularly the concluding day of discussions. These conversations, which will promote exchanges and collaboration between the management and scientific communities, should prove especially valuable.

Webinar: Inclusivity in Cooperation Extension Programming, With and Emphasis on Natural Resources and Climate Change  – Northeast Climate Hub

October 12th at 1 PM Eastern (12 PM Central).  Through a case study from Washington, DC, participants will learn how to get feedback from historically underrepresented groups and tailor cooperative extension programs to people of different races, ages, and academic backgrounds. Some people, such as minorities and those from under-educated and lower income backgrounds, are typically excluded from conversations surrounding the degradation and improvement of ecosystem structure, function, and services. In an effort to provide an opportunity for under-served populations to be heard, inform content creation in academic courses and in cooperative extension programs, and create experiential learning opportunities for students at our land-grant university, we developed a survey instrument to gather public perceptions and knowledge on natural resources and climate change.  For more information on the webinar see here.

Summit: National Tribal Leadership Climate Change Summit

October 12-14, 2020. VIRTUAL MEETING;
Spring 2021: In-person Meeting
.
 
The Affiliated Tribes of NW Indians, National Congress of American Indians, United South and Eastern Tribes, Pacific NW Tribes, and regional and national inter-tribal organizations are convening Tribal Leaders and staff from Tribal Nations, First Nations, and Indigenous communities from around the world. Our goal is to build on the knowledge and experiences related to climate change impacts and traditional knowledges, develop approaches that promote Tribal leadership in adaptation, mitigation, and resiliency, and foster pathways to influence climate policy regionally, nationally, and internationally. The Summit will include internationally renowned plenary speakers, participatory breakout sessions, youth sessions, climate solution exhibition, and more. The Summit will culminate in the development of a policy platform to ensure that Tribal Nations are leaders in moving climate policy forward in the United States and around the world.
CoVid-19 update
In response to CoVid-19, the conference steering committee is proposing to push the in-person meeting to Spring 2021, while also planning on online virtual aspect of the meeting during the original dates (October 12-14, 2020). Please revisit this website here to learn more about our modified plans.

Webinar: Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar Series: Improving Lake Temperature Estimates for Midwestern Fisheries with Process-Guided Deep Learning

October 21st at 12:00 PM Eastern (11:00 AM Central). This webinar presented by Jordan Read, will provide an overview of efforts to build upon existing models for Midwestern lake temperatures, an initiative which has assisted state agencies in understanding trends in walleye and largemouth bass populations in addition to helping predict lake-specific fish populations under future climate scenarios. In particular, results from a “hyperscale” modeling method will be detailed. Registration is not required. For more information see here

Webinar: Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar Series: Supporting Climate Action in the Midwest and Northeast: Forest Service research perspectives and priorities

November 18th at 12:00 PM Eastern (11:00 AM Central). This webinar presented by Beth Larry, will discuss the Northern Research Station (NRS) as one of seven research stations of the USDA Forest Service that provides scientific information and decision tools to help land managers and communities practice sustainable stewardship of their lands and waterways. Based in the twenty-state region of the Northeast and North Central U.S., NRS scientists and staff conduct multi-disciplinary research with diverse partners and practitioners to address the nation’s most pressing forest conservation challenges. For more information see here

Webinar: Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar Series: Supporting Climate Action in the Midwest and Northeast: Forest Service research perspectives and priorities

November 18th at 12:00 PM Eastern (11:00 AM Central). This webinar presented by Beth Larry, will discuss the Northern Research Station (NRS) as one of seven research stations of the USDA Forest Service that provides scientific information and decision tools to help land managers and communities practice sustainable stewardship of their lands and waterways. Based in the twenty-state region of the Northeast and North Central U.S., NRS scientists and staff conduct multi-disciplinary research with diverse partners and practitioners to address the nation’s most pressing forest conservation challenges. For more information see here

Webinar: Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar Series: Variation in Nutrient Loading among Lake Michigan Watersheds: Disentangling Land Use and Discharge Effects 

December 9th at 12:00 PM Eastern (11:00 AM Central). Webinar speaker Peter McIntyre.  A full description will be found here soon.

11th Annual Rooted in the Mountains Symposium – Ama: The Sacredness of Water (Integrating Indigenous Knowledge, Language, Health & Environment)

April 8-9, 2021. Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC. Rooted in the Mountains is an annual symposium that intersects traditional and local knowledge with health and environmental issues. Join the keynote speakers and panelists for an interdisciplinary discussion of water during the 11th Annual Rooted in the Mountains Symposium. This full two-day symposium will occur on the WCU campus with panels and keynoters. Participants leave the symposium with a new sense of urgency and tools to use in valuing our common ground.  Learn more and register HERE.

Conference: Fall 2020 EPA New England Tribal Leaders Summit & Environmental Conference
Postponed until 2021.  

Summit: Shifting Seasons 3

April 19-21, 2021. Menominee Conference Center, Keshena, WI. Hosted by the College of Menominee Nation and respective partners.  The 3rd Shifting Seasons Summit will include climate adaptation training sessions tailored to the needs and capabilities of Tribal Nations but will focus on the development of in-depth case studies based on existing Tribal adaptation work in the Northeast region. This summit would also include relevant Tribal climate change initiatives developed outside of the Northeast by capacity-building organizations, academic institutions and Tribal Nations who have approved climate adaptation plans, thus creating continued network building opportunities. More information can be found HERE.

Conference: National Adaptation Forum

April 26-28, 2021.
Atlanta, GA. This event will gather the adaptation community to foster knowledge exchange, innovation and mutual support for a better tomorrow. Join adaptation practitioners from around the country who are focused on moving beyond adaptation awareness and planning to adaptation action. For more information see here.

Conference: 2021 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference

Postponed until May 10-12, 2021. Durham, NC. The Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference has been postponed to May 10–12, 2021, due to concerns associated with the novel coronavirus pandemic. The CISA team and conference planning committees agree that this postponement will help to ensure the health and safety of our participants. We are especially grateful to our first responders and health care professionals who are on the frontlines, helping to save the lives of so many. We look forward to convening the network in-person next spring. For more information see here

Conference: 2020 Local Solutions: Eastern Regional Climate Preparedness Conference  

May 24-25, 2021. Portland, ME. The 2020 Local Solutions conference will empower participants to take action steps that center climate equity. Climate equity ensures that all people have the opportunity to influence and benefit from climate resilience-building solutions. When we achieve climate equity, all communities will have the opportunity to thrive in the face of climate change, and race, ethnicity, income level, gender, and disability or immigration status will not be factors causing disproportionate vulnerability to climate impacts. For more information see here

Camp: ATNI Tribal Climate Camp

 May 23-28, 2021. Anchorage, AK. Native Organization Host: Chugach Regional Resources Commission. In 2020, the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Michigan State University, Portland State University’s Institute for Tribal Government, Chugach Regional Resources Commission, and the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center are collaboratively offering the Tribal Climate Camp (TCC) to support teams of Tribal leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop Tribal policy needed to address climate change impacts. To learn more about the event see here or contact Peggy Harris at DP@Seventhgenerationllc.com.

Camp: Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress

June 26 – July 3, 2021 (For those students that applied for 2020 NYCALC, their applications will still be valid for 2021). National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, WV.  The Native Youth Community Adaptation and Leadership Congress (NYCALC) is held each summer at the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) in Shepherdstown, WV. The Congress includes a mix of urban and rural students from Tribal Nations and Indigenous communities located throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and American Samoa.  For more information and to apply see here.

Camp: USET Tribal Climate Resilience Camp

July 11-16, 2021, Schoodic Institute, Winter Harbor, ME. Tribal Nation Host: the Penobscot Nation. The USET Office of Environmental Resource Management (USET-OERM) will be holding a Tribal Climate Resilience Camp to support teams of Tribal Leaders, climate change coordinators, planners, and program managers to build skills, gather information, and develop Tribal policies and plans needed for Tribal Nations to address climate change impacts. Information about travel, lodging, and registration will be available soon. For more information contact, Casey Thornbrugh, USET Tribal Climate Science Liaison at CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG.

 

La Niña conditions have set in for the Fall-Winter 2020-2021

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions have remained neutral through the summer, but with continued cooling of sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific, La Niña conditions have developed and are likely to continue impacting the US climate in the fall and winter.  For more information see HERE.

Typically, La Niña conditions develop when sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean are cooler than their seasonal average.  This sets up an air circulation and jet stream pattern that favors more Atlantic hurricanes in the fall and a northerly Jet Stream or storm track favoring wetter than average conditions over the Pacific Northwest and the Midwest regions of the U.S.  La Niña conditions can also favor colder than average conditions during the winter in the Northern Great Plains.


See original map HERE.                    

See original map HERE.

The opposite scenario is El Niño where conditions develop when sea surface temperatures in the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean are warmer than their seasonal average.  This sets up an air circulation and jet stream pattern that favors fewer Atlantic hurricanes in the fall and in the winter, a southerly Jet Stream or storm track favoring wetter than average conditions over the southern tier of the U.S. and drier conditions in the Midwest. Sometimes warmer than average conditions also occur over the northern tier of the U.S. and Canada.  


See original map HERE.                       

See original map HERE

NOAA Provides 2020 Hurricane Preparedness Page

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides a webpage on hurricane preparedness for the 2020 season.  This page provides information on current tropical cyclone activity and hurricane safety including brief, 1 to 2-minute videos on hurricane safety.  The full page can be found here

NOAA Forecasts Above-Average Hurricane Activity in the Atlantic for the 2020 Hurricane Season

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s-Climate Prediction Center (NOAA-CPC) is forecasting a 60% chance of an above-normal season, a 30% chance of a near-normal season and only a 10% chance of a below-normal season. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions are expected to either remain neutral or to trend toward La Niña, meaning there will not be El Niño conditions present (e.g. a strong west-to-east storm track over southern North America), which typically suppresses hurricane activity. Also, warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, coupled with reduced vertical wind shear (i.e. wind shears often break up hurricanes before they can form), weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, and an enhanced west African monsoon (e.g. more moisture-fuel for strong hurricanes to develop in the Atlantic) all increase the likelihood for an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season. Similar conditions have been producing more active seasons since the current high-activity era began in 1995.

For a video summary see here.

For the full story see here.

NOAA State of the Climate Report: Selected Climate Anomalies for August 2020

Explanation of Maps:
The following maps were generated with observed and recorded data from weather stations across the continental United States compiled and displayed at the High Plains Regional Climate Center (HPRCC) located in Lincoln, NE.  The data uses a baseline or “climate normal” based on the 30-year climate averages for locations for the years 1981-2010.  The standard 30-year climate averages will be updated again for the time frame 1991-2020 at the conclusion of year 2020. 

NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Departure from Normal Temperature (°F) for Jun., Jul., & Aug. 2020

Summer 2020 continued to experience significantly warmer than average conditions (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average) in the Southwest and parts of the southern Plains.  Warmer than average conditions also occurred over the northern Plains, the Great Lakes and the Northeast.  Areas of the Southeast and Northern Rockies continued with average to cooler than average temperatures. A single station in Nevada recorded cooler than average (follow-up with station data is recommended).

For more information visit: https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps


NOAA Regional Climate Centers: Percent of Normal Precipitation (%) for Jun., Jul., & Aug. 2020
Summer 2020 continued to experience large areas of drier than average conditions (based on the years 1981-2010 climatological average) across the Southwest, the Rockies and the Northeast.  Wetter than average conditions were observed for smaller areas of the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Gulf Coast, parts of the Central Great Plains, and the Pacific Northwest.  Most notably are the observed drought in the Southwest during the otherwise Southwest/North American Monsoon.  By the end of July, drought conditions existed over 1/3rd of the U.S.

For more information visit: https://hprcc.unl.edu/maps.php?map=ACISClimateMaps

Explanation of the Maps:

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issues seasonal climate forecast maps. These maps show the probabilities of unusually warmer/colder or wetter/drier seasons (relative to the 1981-2010 climate averages). Specifically, “A” indicates chances are leaning toward above average, “B” indicates chances are leaning toward below average, and “EC” indicates that there are equal chances for above average, below average, or average conditions. This information is generated from forecast models that use information on ocean, land, and atmospheric conditions such as sea surface temperatures (e.g. El Niño/La Niña conditions), presence/absence of sea ice or snow pack, and tropical weather patterns that can influence the location of the Jetstream and persistent areas of high/low pressure systems during a season. Note: These are seasonal forecasts not predictions with 100% certainty. For example, a single hurricane with heavy rain or a week-long cold air blast/heat wave can impact the outcome of these forecasts. Please see this 2-minute video on how to interpret these maps.

Temperature & Precipitation Outlooks

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The fall-early winter (October-November-December; OND) 2020 temperature outlook is for the entire U.S. is leaning toward above average temperatures especially for the Southwest, but also in the Northeast, and northern Alaska.

The OND 2020 precipitation outlook indicates a leaning toward above average seasonal precipitation for coastal-western Alaska and the northern Rockies-Pacific Northwest of the continental U.S. Below average precipitation is of the highest probability over the Southwest and southern Plains.

Resolutions, Reports & Testimonies

2018:SPF 002 Maine Tribal Aquatic Ecosystems in Peril

2017:003 Authorization to Apply for Federal Funding for Natural Resource Management Programs

2016:037 Authorization for USET to Seek Federal Funding for BIA Tribal Climate Resilience Program

2016:034 Climate Change Impacts and Response Actions to Protect Human Health, Tribal Lands, Water and Natural Resources, Cultural Identity, and Sovereignty

2013:036 Authorization to Submit a Funding Proposal for Ethnobotanical Climate Change Adaptation Planning

2010:010 Support for Tribal Energy Capacity Development and Implementation

2011:055 Support the Formation of a National Tribal Water Advisory Committee


Testimony of United South and Eastern Tribes Sovereignty Protection Fund Submitted to the House Natural Resources Subcommittee for Indigenous People of the United States for the Record of the February 12, 2019 Hearing, “The Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal Communities” February 26 2019

USET Climate Program Staff

Casey Thornbrugh is the Tribal Climate Science Liaison with United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) and is a citizen of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Based at the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (NE CASC) at UMass-Amherst, Casey provides current climate science information to Tribal Nations in both the NE CASC and the Southeast Climate Adaptation Science Center (SE CASC) regions. Casey also works with Tribal Nations to identify climate research needs and priorities and provide climate adaptation planning support.

Email: CThornbrugh@USETINC.ORG

Phone: NE CASC Office – (413) 545-2619    USET Mobile – (615) 589-1629

Tyler Everett is a Forest Adaptation Technical Assistant working for USET to provide Climate Change and Forest  Adaptation planning technical support to Tribal Nations.  Tyler is a citizen of the Aroostook Band of Micmacs and is a forester specializing in forest pests, namely the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), which is impacting Black/Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) on Tribal lands in northern forests.  Tyler works remotely from Maine and assists with USET Climate Change trainings, writing retreats and other climate change adaptation events. He is also in the Ph.D. program at the School of Forest Resources at the University of Maine.

Email: teverett@usetinc.org   

SC CASC and MW CASC Tribal Liaisons 

April Taylor is a Sustainability Scientist and Tribal Liaison with the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (SC CASC) and is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation. April is based at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, OK and works with the goal of building research relationships with Tribal Nations in the SC CASC region.  She is actively involved with the training and development of resources for Tribal health and climate change vulnerability assessments.

Email: April.Taylor@chickasaw.net

Phone: Office – (580) 235-7430   

                                  

Sara Smith is the Midwest Tribal Resilience Liaison with the College of Menominee Nation as part of the Sustainable Development Institute.  She is a direct descendent of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin.  Sara is stationed at the US Forest Service’s Northern Forest Research Station on the University of Minnesota campus in St. Paul, Minnesota. Sara serves as a direct liaison between Tribal Nations in the Midwest and the NE CASC to identify and address research gaps in climate, natural, and cultural resources as well as improve outreach and capacity building.  Sara also coordinates meetings of the Northeast Indigenous Climate Resilience Network (NICRN). 

Email: ssmith@menominee.edu

Phone: Office – (651) 649-5134

July 2020 Story Archive

June 2020 Story Archive

May 2020 Story Archive

Fourth National Climate Assessment Vol II + SOCCR2

February 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

January 2018 Tribal Climate Highlights

October 2019 Tribal Climate Headlines